The Met places over 375,000 artworks into the public domain for unrestricted use

By Christopher Jobson

Earlier this week, the Metropolitan Museum of Art announced that more than 375,000 images found in the museum’s online collection are now available for free and unrestricted use. The high-resolution images are licensed under Creative Commons, the non-profit organization that facilities the public use of some 1.1 billion digital works.

The announcement is an update to the Met’s 2014 initiative placing hundreds of thousands of images into the public domain, but the expanded policy, called Open Access, now allows for unrestricted usage including commercial purposes. The vast library of paintings, historical objects, photographs, textiles, and prints can now be utilized anywhere for any purpose. Metropolitan Museum of Art Director and CEO Thomas P. Campbell shares in the announcement:

We have been working toward the goal of sharing our images with the public for a number of years. Our comprehensive and diverse museum collection spans 5,000 years of world culture and our core mission is to be open and accessible for all who wish to study and enjoy the works of art in our care. Increasing access to the Museum’s collection and scholarship serves the interests and needs of our 21st-century audiences by offering new resources for creativity, knowledge, and ideas. We thank Creative Commons, an international leader in open access and copyright, for being a partner in this effort.

All images available through the new Open Access policy are searchable on the Met’s website. Simply check the “Public Domain Artworks” option under “Show only” and start searching. Seen here is a small collection of images available through the new policy. (via My Modern Met)

Victorian Interior I. Horace Pippin, 1945. Oil on canvas.

Openwork furniture plaque with ram-headed sphinx. Neo-Assyrian. ca. 9th–8th century B.C.

Jean-Léon Gérôme, 1868–69. Oil on cavas.

Panel with striding lion. Mesopotamia, Babylon (modern Hillah, Iraq) ca. 604–562 B.C. Ceramic, glaze.

Mäda Primavesi. Gustav Klimt, 1912–13. Oil on canvas.

Frederick Douglass. Portrait by Mathew B. Brady, 1880.

Award to the Hammond Typewriter Company. Jules-Clément Chaplain (French, Mortagne, Orne 1839–1909 Paris). Bronze.

Via

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